Sunday, March 15, 2015

Paleo Event Giveaway

Want to win a Kindle and free ebooks? Check out this giveaway! 

Paleo Event Giveaway



And if you have a Kindle and don't want another one (which I will never understand but will try not to judge your choices. Out loud.) check out the upcoming Paleo event giveaway!




Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Monday, March 9, 2015

Book Review: Halith

HalithHalith by Kirsten Kelly
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Halith has always had a love/hate relationship with her destiny. On the one hand, she has always known she was meant to be a warrior, despite the obvious gender stereotype issue. On the other hand, people in her life keep pointing her toward her true destiny, and she doesn’t like following directions. In keeping with her defiance of the norm, she gathers her friends and makes plans to thwart the war of the inevitable. At the heart of it though, is her desire to meet her famous father and find out if he is the missing piece she always assumed he was.

Fans of RPGs will see a lot of familiar elements, the fantasy world, the races, the series of increasingly more difficult quests, random objects picked up that play a part in the story later, a team of differently abled people that form a cohesive unit because each has a skill necessary for the group. This one is chock full of girl power, although honestly that isn’t as rare in the fantasy world. Although the gamer in me cringed a few times, and the writing critic in me a few more, I think it is a solid first novel, although I suspect as the series progresses you might cringe a little if you go back to read the first attempt. The writing is a little flat, and sometimes jumps back and forth from strange old English to modern, and the relationships progress rather fast and conveniently, but still a story emerged, and I hope it’s one that digs a little deeper in the next installment.


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Book Review: The Royal Dragoneers

The Royal Dragoneers (The Dragoneers Saga, #1)The Royal Dragoneers by M.R. Mathias
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The trolls are invading, and have been sited even near Jenka’s remote town of Crag. While out hunting, he encounters something he never thought he would see, a dragon, and what’s more, a dragon who defends him. Thus begins Jenka’s journey to Jade, his bonded dragon, and together they find others who likewise have kept a deep secret of actual communication with dragons. When they discover the real reason behind the increased troll activity, they must bond together as Dragoneers to fight the coming horde. But will they be able to protect the Kingdom and fight the great conflict to come?



Tolkein once said, “It simply isn’t an adventure worth telling if there aren’t any dragons.” M.R. Mathias has taken that to heart and showcases dragons at both their best and worst in this beginning of the Dragoneer saga. He sets the stage by introducing Jenka and a quick back story, but the story then is off and running at a pretty hectic pace. Mathias’ work is marked by short scenes that intertwine to tell a much larger tale. While I love the frenzy of it, towards the end it seemed a little too fast paced, jumping from battle to battle without too much explanation of where and why, and I would have liked a little more emotional description, as demonstrated in the beginning of the book. Still it is a wonderfully epic adventure, a great set up for a longer series, and engaging for both kids and adults alike. If you enjoy losing yourself in a fantasy world full of both wonderful and terrifying creatures, the Dragoneers await!


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Friday, February 20, 2015

Book Review: The Beast of Seabourne

The Beast of Seabourne (Artefact, #2)The Beast of Seabourne by Rhys A. Jones
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Oz and his friends Ellie and Rufus have a sneaking suspicion that the Obsidian pebble was not the end of the story. Using Soph, the avatar for the clever tech found in the pebble, they go on a search for the next artifact, the black ring. It has been found once before, but that man met with an unpleasant demise. Will they be able to find it before the Beast of Seabourne unleashes on them, the way it has unleashed on some of their school bullies? And will they be able to prevent the evil scheme Gerber is trying to unleash on the world? Follow these unlikely heroes as they hunt down and discover exactly what the Beast of Seabourne really is.

The Beast of Seabourne, book two in the Artefact Quintet, follows Oz and his friends as they try to unravel the mystery left to Oz by his late father, who was mysteriously murdered after its discovery, and now it seems that murder is coming after Oz as well. Author Rhys A. Jones spins a clever tale that is perfect for the tween set, much inspired by J.K. Rowling style children’s literature without totally ripping it off, as is often done. This series has magic that is ultimately explained by tech, and totally engages both children and adults alike in unweaving the mystery of the artifacts that appeared over 100 years ago. It is set in England, so American readers might not be totally familiar with the school system or some of the slang, but that doesn’t really get in the way of the story and certainly does not hinder the character development. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and am very much looking forward to reading the rest of the series!


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Monday, February 16, 2015

Book Review: Hierarchies of Greed

Hierarchies of GreedHierarchies of Greed by Michael Patrick Clark
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

During the Cold War a major London Soviet spy cell was blown, and both American Gerald Hammond and Russian Stanislav Paslov are investigating the leak, which may lead much higher up than anyone ever anticipated. Their unlikely relationship leads to a transnational investigation that will put both they and their loved ones in great danger. Both men of integrity, committed to their cause, they find themselves dancing with the devil they know and the devil they don't

An intriguing novel, well researched and characters developed, Hierarchies of Greed offers an insightful glance into Cold War politics and intrigue. I’ll be honest, it took me a while to get into it at the beginning, as spy novels necessarily must set the scene rather thoroughly and I got a little bogged down in the details. The glossary at the back was helpful, as I did start to get character wires crossed at first. However I thought as a whole it was really well written and the characters were compelling, and I have to admit I’m a sucker for historical novels. The plot leads you criss-crossing the ocean and second guessing your guesses as to who the real leak is. Looking forward to the next one!


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Friday, February 6, 2015

Book Review: I Was an Unsolved Mystery

I Was an Unsolved Mystery: A Fugitive's StoryI Was an Unsolved Mystery: A Fugitive's Story by Thomas Lion
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Tom Lion was done with his pot-dealing days, not that he thought there was anything wrong with smoking pot. It was a moral issue, as far as he was concerned rather than a government one. Unfortunately for him, the US government thought differently, particularly during the War on Drugs of the 80’s and 90’s. In his memoir, he details his life a fugitive, on the run from his capture that was due, in part, to his appearance on the hit TV show Unsolved Mysteries.

To say Lion’s memoir is well-written would be an understatement and probably selling it a little short. While the narrative could have used a once-over in editing to catch a few minor mispells and text corrections, the characters are well-developed and relatable, and the memoir from prison style is quite engaging. His details about money laundering, national politics sway of the drug market, and drug lifestyle are fascinating and really helpful to understand his opinions. Whether you agree or not, his political stance and opinions are enlightening, and really must be taken seriously given his first hand involvement. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for perspective on the marijuana debate in this country, regardless of what side you tend to favor. There is plenty of pot politics and opinions espoused by Lion, but even so the story is quite gripping. Ultimately, you are left pondering your own stance on pot politics, and any book that forces the reader to delve deeply into the “why” of his or her own thoughts and opinions


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Monday, February 2, 2015

Book Review: Legend of the Stone: Chapter 1

Legend of the Stone: Chapter I (Loserville Engineering The Successions)Legend of the Stone: Chapter I by Lucas R. Ballard
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Lucas is a project. Tortured by scientists and soldiers since his discovery at age 8, he has managed to survive everything they have thrown at him. He is an asset, but a resentful one. When the opportunity to escape arises he takes it, and takes out many of the torturers while doing so. He finds a rare friend who saves his life, and together they discover the power of the stone he found during his escape. Will he and Juan survive their attempt to hijack a freighter and leave the moon, or will their stone-enhanced powers be too little, too late?

I really wanted to like this book. The premise of Merlin’s magic returning to humans after he casts it out intrigued me, as did the prospect of it coming to a man mottled by experimentation. But the writing was just.so.bad. There were run-ons and fragments, tenses jumping in and out all over the place, strange redundancies, and obvious wrong words, like “cloths” instead of “clothes.” There was also blatant contradictions, such as referring to a lifeless body that was breathing. I really think the storyline has potential, but the text itself is in dire need of editing.


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Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.