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Showing posts from May, 2014

Book Review: Khu

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Khu: A Tale of Ancient Egypt by Jocelyn Murray
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The story of Khu follows a boy with mysterious golden eyes as he helps his father, Pharoah Mentuhotep, fulfill the prophecy of Neferti unify upper and lower Egypt somewhere around 2020 B.C. The story is based on actual events of the rise of Egypt’s Middle Kingdom, although Khu is a fictional character. The fictional part of the story introduces the orphan, Khu, as he is saved in Moses-like fashion by one of Mentuhotep’s wives, and becomes the adopted son of the Pharoah. His golden eyes reveal the sixth sense that he has always possessed and is utilized extensively by his father to rule well.

The language used was very descriptive - almost to the point of flowery - and really helped the reader engage his/her senses of ancient Egypt. I loved the use of real history, even though the story was woven around fictional characters. I especially appreciated the historical information and pictures at the end that detailed …

Don't Forget the Reason

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No book review today, just wanted to remind everyone that while you are at your BBQ to take a minute to remember why we have the day off. Someone died so you could have a parade, and while I am all for celebrating the country they fought for, I also think sometimes we forget the sacrifice. Don't leave the memory out of Memorial Day. 

Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Book Review: Within a Presumption of Godlessness

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Within a Presumption of Godlessness by Tom Dauria
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In Within A Presumption of Godlessness author Tom Dauria explores the shifting views of modern society from the traditional basis of the assumption of a supreme deity or deities to the the presumption that there is no god. This modern interpretation of the metaphysical realm assumes that science offers the only explanation of origin, purpose and the afterlife, and that religion is the opiate of the masses. Dauria explores such topics as the theory of evolution and its origins, modern media dismissing and even demonizing Judeo-Christian culture, and revisionist history that writes God and faith out of what is taught in academia today.

I was thrilled to see a book that takes on some of the modern cultural myths that have somehow permeated our ethos, particularly straightening out some of the revisionist history. I was a little annoyed by the constant referencing of the “too smart” and “educated stupid” as I thou…

Birth Mom Blog Series over at AGOHA

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So this week I'm covering the gamut, I've posted book reviews, explained a little about essential oils (EOs) and now I'm talking about my other job, adoption.

I LOVE adoption.

Don't misunderstand, adoption is challenging. it's gritty, it's grief-filled, there are a lot of problems with the system, it can be heartbreaking. But just like many of the most difficult parts of your life, it's absolutely wonderful. I really challenge people to take a hard look about how they feel about adoption, particularly those who allow their kids to be adopted by others. What is your stereotype of a birth parent? Is it really accurate, particularly accurate for modern adoption, or do you still see it the way it was 50 years ago?


Tina Tyra and I have been collaborating on a blog series for biological parents on how to get started with adoption and things you need to consider - including whether it's the right decision for you or not. If you know anyone who is considering ad…

Book Review: Baseball Dads

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Baseball Dads by Matthew S. Hiley
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I hate baseball. This is a very unpopular sentiment as I now live in a baseball town, with some of the best baseball fans on earth. I appreciate what it does for the local economy, and yes, haters, I understand the game. I just don’t find it enjoyable. This book, though, was right up my alley. For those of you diehards there is plenty of baseball, and for those of you into sarcasm noire Baseball Dads definitely is a love story. I will warn you, there is a lot of language, drugs and impossible porny sex, so don’t read it if you have a sensitive stomach. There is also a character who cannot text to save his life, for all you grammar nazis out there. But the basic gist of the story is one Dad, Dwayne, is tired of his talented son being overlooked on his baseball team because he refuses to play into the social politics that is apparently very common in Texas youth sports. Rather than kiss up to the coach, he arranges for him to me…

Book Review: Severed Threads

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Severed Threads by Kaylin McFarren
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The first book in the Threads series, Severed Threads introduces us to unlucky Chase Cohen, a salvager who spends his time underwater treasure hunting, and Rachel Lyons, the daughter of a salvager who is determined not to rekindle a relationship with Chase, as she holds him responsible for her father’s untimely death. However, when Rachel is forced to help her brother get out of the clutches of criminals, she and Chase team up to find fabled treasure Heart of the Dragon, hidden somewhere in the wreck of the Wan Li, a legendary Chinese ghost ship, and a gamble as to whether it actually exists or not.

In Severed Threads, author Kaylin McFarren does an excellent job of setting up a back story both of the fabled treasure ship and its supposed curse of Mae Li, the unrequited mistress of a sea captain, as well as the spark between Rachel and Chase. She weaves in many secondary characters well, but the focus of the story is clearly…

Book Review: The Gnostic Prophecy

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The Gnostic Prophecy by Mike Vasich
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

One of the earliest Christian heresies, the Gnostics were convinced that they had a "spark" that others didn't. This made them special enough to be like Jesus, and tough luck if you didn't have the spark. The Gnostic Prophecy explores what that means for one Cerise Davenport, as she follows the trail of a colleague who ends up with a mysterious scroll that may just divulge exactly how right or wrong the Gnostics were. On the way she meets up with a mysterious little girl, an old flame struggling with the loss of his family, and a few naked superhuman teenagers determined to take her out.

The Gnostic Prophecy is a quick and interesting read, and actually does a great job of explaining Gnosticism in a nutshell for those uninitiated. It does end up with some spiritual interplay at the end, including some pretty weird interaction with "God." If you are interested in early Christianity, particularly th…

Free Ebooks from Blogelina!

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Have you ever considered blogging for a little extra income? If you aren't sure how to do so check out this package of *currently* FREE ebooks chock full of tips and tricks to turn your blog into a blossoming side business. I'm working my way through them now - guess we'll see if they work! And hey, anything you learn and successfully implement is pure profit, right?

Feel free to leave reviews of the books in the comments, especially if you read faster than me :)

Please note, while there may be affiliate links or payment for reviews, all opinions are my own. You can't buy a good review from me, people. I am way too mouthy for that.

Book Review: Evening Wolves

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Crescent’s finest homicide detective, Mike Erland, is called into Fircrest Manor to investigate the murder of a beautiful, unknown stranger who was an attendee at a Libertarian fundraiser. Imagine his surprise to come face to face with her later, or rather her twin sister, who happens to be a special agent for Homeland Security. What follows is a whirlwind investigation into both her twin’s murder and determination to solve the case she was working on, involving an international information dealer and huge security threat to the US.
“Evening Wolves” is a Biblical reference (Hab 1:8-11) to those who are in it for the violence and don’t care who they hurt, they just sweep in and out and leave death in their wake. This story is full of such characters; they sweep in, kill and leave. Some get their justice in the end, but not until they have done as much damage as they can. This is a fast paced story with a lot of characters, but in the end you are rooting for Mike and Sierra to catch the…

Book Review: Shape Shifters of the Suburbs

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Shape Shifters of the Suburbs - The Boy From The Temple of Heaven by Luke Loaghan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Mary Johnson has always wanted a child, and finally is able to adopt a 5 year old Chinese boy, one year before she ages out of the program. The adoption agency told her he was “different,” but she didn’t realize how different until she finally saw him change into an animal in his sleep. Breccan is a shape shifter, and it turns out a very powerful one at that. Unbelievably, in their sleepy Long Island suburb, more shape shifters emerge, and must band together to fight the evil presence that has been growing there for the past 30 years.

This book is written simply and is a little redundant in some places, but is a great read for tweens. Everyone wants to have a super power, and Breccan goes on a journey of discovery about his and learns to both work with and protect his friends, even those with similar powers. As he ends his tenure in middle school, however, new alliances are forme…